New Guide to Preservation Design Review

CPHS has published an updated procedural guide to preservation design review in Cleveland Park. Download the guide here, or view it as a web page.

If you are planning work on your historic district property or are preparing to present a project to our Architectural Review Committee, everything you need to know is there, including contact information for our ARC, ANC3C, and the DC Historic Preservation Office; sample project presentations; and links to Historic Preservation Office design guidelines.

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Architectural Review Committee Report: December 2016

ARC Members attending: Ana Evans, David Kay, Danny Ince, Win Brown, Stefan Hurray, Anne Weir, Ron Ngiam, Tina Mead. Also attending was Carin Ruff, CPHS Executive Director.

HPA 17-78

3529 Ordway Street, NW

Concept/rear addition and garage

Architect: Chris Snowber, Hamilton Snowber Architects

The proposal is for a three-story (two stories plus basement) addition on the rear of a 1934 brick house, plus a new garage off the alley at the rear of the property. Because of the steep slope of the lot, the basement is above grade at the rear of the house.

The addition would be clad in brick on the basement and first level and HardiePlank siding on the upper level. A dormer in the front of the house whose wood siding is decayed would be reclad in matching material, and windows would be replaced in kind. There would be several changes to the fenestration on the side façades.

The ARC has no objection to the proposal. However, the ARC would prefer to see the existing fenestration retained on the second floor on the west side, in keeping with the Secretary of the Interior’s guidelines recommending against “Changing the number, location, size or glazing pattern of windows, through cutting new openings, (or) blocking-in windows,” and the HPO guideline, “Alteration of window openings on secondary elevations that are architecturally composed or contribute to the overall character and design of a property is discouraged.”

The motion passed 8-0.

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Architectural Review Committee Report: November 2016

ARC Members attending: Christine Hobbs, Phil Eagleburger, Ana Evans, David Kay, Lois Orr, and Win Brown.

The following were present to observe the meeting: Nick Netchvolodoff, Tom Hester, Stefan Hurray, Abigail Porter, Myra Best, and Frank Swain, CPHS Board members; Steve Callcott, Deputy Preservation Officer, DC Office of Planning; and Carin Ruff, CPHS Executive Director.

 

Washington International School

Clayton Lewis, Head of School and Doug Bothner, Ziger/Snead

The Washington International School (WIS) is proposing to construct a two-story science and technology classroom building, and an underground parking garage at the Tregaron campus of the school. Included in the proposal, which situates the new building on the north slope of the Tregaron campus, are plans to repave and repair the entrance driveway and the stone gutters, remove invasive plants from the property, remove 27 trees to be replaced by new, smaller trees, and create a safer arrival space for students. Parking would become more consolidated and a new pedestrian plaza created by wrapping the existing Gym with the new building. The proposed building does not impinge on the historic structures on the site, including the Mansion.

Several previous proposals have been presented by the school. The current proposal, Design # 4, reduces the height of the building by 13 feet, resulting in a building that would be 29 feet above grade. The mass has been broken up into five “boxes” (20 x28 feet) and four hyphens (12 feet wide and set back four feet.). A Green Roof is also included and materials include weathered copper and brick.

The Washington International School is uniquely situated, surrounded by and sharing a cultural landscape with the Tregaron Conservancy. A country estate, originally built in 1912, Tregaron today is on the National Register of Historic Places and a contributing element of the Cleveland Park Historic District. WIS is also housed in several historic buildings on the site. A review of this project included several facets including the proposed building itself, its relationship to the existing historic structures, its relationship to the existing landscape and the visual impact of the proposal particularly on the north, Macomb Street side of the property.

WIS has held meetings with the neighbors. The Tregaron Conservancy and a number of nearby neighbors expressed concern about the project and its visual impact on Macomb Street. It should be noted that not all of the neighbors oppose the project.

The ARC vote was split 3-3 on the proposal project. All of the members of the ARC favored the architectural design and the improvements in massing from the earlier proposals. Those who voted to object to the proposal thought that the additional encroachment of the new building was not consistent with the preservation of the historic landscape and unreasonably impinged on the character of the immediate neighborhood; those who did not object thought that the encroachment was acceptable relative to the total acreage of the property and felt that the project represented a reasonable evolution in the usage of the property that was sufficiently respectful of the historic nature of the landscape.

 

3016 Rodman Street, N.W.

Owners: Ferrari & Tyson

Agent: Phil Eagleburger, Treacy & Eagleburger

The proposal includes a rear roof addition on a semi-detached house built in the mid-1920s. The house is one of six on the south side of Rodman Street. The addition would be tucked in behind the mansard, tile roof and a small balcony added in the rear. Several windows on the east and south side of the house would also be replaced. The addition would not be visible from across the street but slightly visible from the side yard. The existing front dormer would remain.

The neighbors have been contacted and support the project.

The ARC had no objection to the proposal. The motion passed 5-0; Eagleburger recused.

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Solar Panels and a Garage Conversion

In September, the DC Historic Preservation Review Board with the support of our Architectural Review Committee approved two projects that will be of interest to many. Read more about them below. (Visit this page to read up on how projects in our historic district are reviewed.)


Solar panels on a foursquare: possible, but not everywhere; design and placement are crucial

The first case was a request for solar panels on the roof of a typical Cleveland Park foursquare on Newark Street. There is a lot of interest in going solar in our neighborhood and DC is encouraging solar energy. Historic Preservation Office guidelines, however, generally limit solar panels to roof surfaces that are invisible from the street. The reason for that is that an essential aspect of preserving the historic appearance of houses is preserving their character-defining roof profiles and materials. Solar panels have the potential to obscure both.

The solar-must-be-invisible standard makes it fairly easy to add solar to the flat roofs behind the main façades of typical DC row houses, which make up a large proportion of the housing stock in DC’s residential historic districts. Cleveland Park, of course, is low on row houses and rich in interesting pitched roofs with slopes, dormers, gables, and turrets. For houses with sloped roofs, HPO guidelines generally allow adding panels on rear roof slopes and on the roofs of additions that are not part of the main body of the original house, but preservation standards make it impossible to have solar panels on street-facing roof slopes, which means that in most cases houses on the north side of the street will not be able to have south-facing panels.

Rendering of solar panels on Foursquare roof

Rendering of how solar panels will appear on the west slope of 3215 Newark Street (Prospect Solar)

The applicants in the current case, whose house faces south, had originally proposed solar panels in 2012 and were denied by HPRB because the panels would have been too visually intrusive. They returned this fall with a proposal for a careful arrangement of west-facing panels. The panels proposed this time would be close in color to the roof shingles, kept well back from the roof ridge, set close (~3″-4″) to the surface of the roof, and matte in finish without the typical contrasting, shiny frame that makes many panels stand out. The side slopes of this house on which the panels will be mounted are either invisible or barely visible to a pedestrian on the street. Those features were the basis for the ARC’s support and HPRB’s approval.

In sum: we want to support solar panels where they can be implemented without damaging historic materials or altering character-defining historic roof lines. If you are interested in solar panels for your own house, start by contacting the Historic Preservation Office (Steve Callcott, 202-741-5247 or email) to discuss your individual case. HPO staff will let you know what might be possible given your house’s style and setting. And whether or not solar is possible for you, there are many ways to improve the energy performance of a historic house, on which HPO can also advise.


The first garage conversion under the new zoning code: Yes to exuberance!

September saw the implementation of DC’s long-awaited revised zoning code, which allows homeowners in single-family zones to add to their properties one accessory dwelling unit – either in their house or in a freestanding structure – as long as they occupy either the main house or the accessory unit themselves.

The first Cleveland Park application for historic preservation review under this provision of the new code was to rebuild an alley-facing garage at a Rodman Street property. The garage would become a freestanding “granny pod.” (Read more and see renderings in this Curbed DC blog post.) Over the summer, the ARC reviewed two versions of the proposal: one that would have largely retained the look of the existing garage, and one much more contemporary version with a reorientation of the roof, solar panels facing the alley, and a green roof.

Garage conversion at 3406 Rodman StreetGarage conversion at 3406 Rodman Street (archi-TEXTUAL)

The ARC preferred and strongly supported the more adventurous, more contemporary proposal. As the ARC wrote in its report, the ARC felt that the more conservative proposal was “not in concert with the goals and aspirations of the Cleveland Park Historic District. One of the most important tenets of the Historic District is to not stifle the type of exuberance that created the district to begin with. Of course that does not mean that anything goes, but it does firmly suggest that there is room for change and innovation within the historic context. As Kathy Wood wrote to the neighborhood when the ARC and the Historic District were new, ‘We want [the historic preservation review process] to encourage rather than discourage innovative architectural design.’ (Voices 1.1, Spring 1987)” The HPO staff, though they originally supported the more conservative version, ultimately agreed with the ARC, and the Historic Preservation Review Board unanimously approved the proposal illustrated above.

Note that such a complete remaking of a garage may be appropriate in a situation like this where the existing garage and the ensemble of garages of which it is a part are noncontributing (dating from after the period of significance and of no special historic importance) and the backyard/alley setting hide the accessory building from the historic streetscape. Preservation standards would not support demolition or substantial alteration of a garage that was original to the house, part of an intact ensemble of early garages, or, as is the case at many properties in Cleveland Park, an early garage that is at the side of the house and visible from the street.

 

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Architectural Review Committee Report: October 2016

ARC Members attending: Christine Hobbs, Lois Orr, Phil Eagleburger, Anne Weir, and Danny Ince.

Also attending were Frank Swain, CPHS Board member and Carin Ruff, CPHS Executive Director.

 

3401 34th Place NW, HPA 16-680

Concept/add dormer window, enlarge existing bay; build retaining wall

The proposal includes modifications to both the house and the grounds. A new retaining wall is proposed along the sidewalk on both 34th Place and Newark Street. The side yard facing Newark would be leveled and a fence installed above the new retaining wall. The front steps would be rebuilt. The proposal indicates that brick would be used for the retaining wall and the steps.

A new third floor dormer is proposed for the south side of the house, to match the existing dormer on the front of the house. The skylights on both the south and north sides of the roof would be removed. Also on the south side, the first floor bay would be widened, with siding to match the existing and new wood steps added to the rear of the porch. On the north side, the areaway and steps to the basement would be enlarged, with new windows added at both the basement level and the first and second floors. It is proposed to excavate and expand the basement.

The neighbors have been contacted.

The ARC had no objection to many of the elements of this proposal but has the following comments:

Particular care should be taken to match the proposed third floor south dormer with the existing front dormer at both the roof and the walls.

While the ARC supports the construction of a retaining wall and the leveling of the side yard, the fence should not be placed on top of the proposed wall. The fence should keep its current location, so that it is set back from the wall. The use of vegetation should be considered instead of a fence, as should the grading of the yard between the wall and the fence. It is important that the yard maintain an open appearance to the street and that the wall match the streetscape in materials and design. With this in mind, stone may be a more appropriate material to use. The ARC requests additional information on the height of the wall at the east and west ends of the Newark Street property line.

The motion passed 5-0

 

3310 Ordway Street NW, HPA 16-628 (revised plans)

Concept/alterations and two-story addition to non-contributing building

The proposal to substantially alter and expand this non-contributing building was presented to the ARC last month. The house was built in 1955 and is one of three houses built at approximately the same time in this block of Ordway Street. While the first floor would be maintained, the existing second floor would be removed, replaced by a newly constructed second and third floors. The house would also be expanded to the rear. The new two-story side addition would also house a garage, accessed by a graded driveway

Last month, the ARC stated that even though the existing house is a non-contributing structure, the proposal will have an impact on the streetscape and the neighborhood. It is important that the structure relate visually to its neighbors and be compatible in scale, materials, and massing. Modern design, well executed, has a place in the Cleveland Park Historic District. The ARC found that last month’s proposal did not meet the criteria for new construction and that the quality of the design was lacking. The design was disjointed including the variety of window and roof styles and materials. The proposed structure did not connect to its neighbors in scale, materials and context. The ARC did not support the proposal presented last month.

The proposal has now been redesigned and much improved, with a redesign of the roof line, windows and materials, including the use of stucco.

The ARC has the following comment: While the design is much improved, the ARC remains concerned about the front wall and the retaining walls along the steeply graded ramp to the garage. The ARC requests more detailed drawings of the retaining wall, the front wall and the driveway.

The motion passed 5-0

 

3433 33rd Place NW (Cleveland Park Club), HPA 16-701

Concept/alterations, site work and deck

The building housing the Cleveland Park Club was built in 1900. The proposal includes repairs to the porch foundation wall, and replacing the existing brick front steps with wider, wooden steps as originally built. Also included in the proposal is resurfacing the existing pool deck and constructing a new deck and patio. There would also be a new ramp off of Ordway Street and repair of a failing stairway.

The neighbors have been contacted.

The ARC has no objection to the proposal as presented.

The motion passed 5-0.

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Architectural Review Committee Report: September 2016

Cleveland Park Historical Society Architectural Review Committee
Monday September 12, 2016
REPORT

ARC Members attending: Christine Hobbs, Tina Mead, Ron Ngiam, Lois Orr, David Kay and Ana Evans. Also attending were Myra Best, Tom Hester, and John Buchanan, CPHS Board members, and Carin Ruff, CPHS Executive Director.

3215 Newark Street, NW, HPA 16-542

The proposal includes the installation of roof-mounted solar panels on the west side of the house. The dark panels would be mounted so that the face of the panels would be no more than four inches above the newly-installed dark shingles. There would be no distinctive metal framing on the panels.

A similar proposal had been presented to the ARC in 2012. At that time, the ARC generally supported the proposal; however, HPO expressed some concerns and requested that the homeowners restudy the proposal in order to avoid mounting the panels on the main roof. This new proposal addresses many of the previous concerns about visibility. The neighbors have been notified about the new proposal and many have expressed strong support.

Since the panels would have minimal impact, closely match the color of the shingles, be removable within a day, and not change the roof line, the ARC has no objection to this proposal.

The motion passed 6-0.

3416 Rodman Street, N.W.

Since there were no plans or drawings of the proposed project, the ARC was not able to evaluate the proposal. The ARC will review the proposal at a future date, following receipt of the plans and drawings.

3310 Ordway Street NW, HPA 16-628

The proposal includes substantial alteration of and a new two-story addition to a non-contributing building. The house was built in 1955 and is one of three houses built at approximately the same time in this block of Ordway Street. While the first floor would be maintained, the existing second floor would be removed, replaced by newly constructed second and third floors. The house would also be expanded to the rear. The new two-story side addition would also house a garage, accessed by a graded driveway. The window and door types and design have not yet been fully developed. The brick on the existing first floor would be maintained, while the additions would be fiber cement siding and panels. The roof on the main body of the house would be asphalt shingle. The roof on the addition would be a standing seam metal roof with sky lights. The owner is in the process of contacting the neighbors. (The ARC neighbor consultation form was received the following day.)

Even though the existing house is a non-contributing structure, the proposal will have an impact on the streetscape and the neighborhood. It is important that the structure relate visually to its neighbors and be compatible in scale, materials, and massing. Modern design, well executed, has a place in the Cleveland Park Historic District. The ARC finds this proposal does not meet the criteria for new construction and that the quality of the design is lacking. The design is disjointed, with the variety of window and roof styles and materials proposed. The proposed structure does not connect to its neighbors in scale, materials and context. The ARC does NOT support this proposal.

The motion passed 6-0.

3300 Lowell Street, NW, HPA 16-547

The proposal includes a two-story addition with basement storage and finished attic on the west side of the house. The siding and roofing material on the addition would match the existing house. The windows on the existing house are primarily six over six. The windows on the addition would be six over one on the first floor and six over six on the second floor. The addition is on the side of the house due to the lack of a rear yard; however, it is subordinate to the existing house, set back from the main body of the house, and clearly differentiated from the existing house . The windows on the side and on the first floor make a deliberate attempt to recreate the feeling of an enclosed side porch. The neighbors have been contacted.

The ARC has no objection to the proposal as presented but emphasizes the importance of retaining the existing low, open fencing surrounding the yard on the west side.

The motion passed 6-0.

3015 Porter Street, NW, HPA 16-610

The proposal includes a one-story addition on the rear of the house with a roof deck above, new rear stairs to the basement, a translucent roof on the front porch, and enlarged windows on the west wall. The siding of the new addition would match the existing addition. The neighbors have been contacted but the ARC form is still outstanding.

While the ARC has no objection to the general concept of this addition and to the materials and scale, the ARC is concerned about the impact of the addition on the adjoining neighbor. The east side elevation was not presented nor was the design for the proposed translucent roof at the front porch noted in the drawings.

The motion passed 6-0.

3520 35th Street, NW, HPA 16-620

The proposal includes a rear addition: new 2nd floor and attic above an existing one-story addition and a new one-story addition to the rear of that. The windows on the addition would be six over one, matching those on the existing structure. The gable roof of the addition would be compatible with the existing roof and clearly delineated from the original. The entire addition is compatible in scale, massing, size, and materials with the existing house. The neighbors have been contacted.
The ARC has no objection to the proposal as presented.

The motion passed 6-0.

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Architectural Review Committee Report: June 2016

Cleveland Park Historical Society Architectural Review Committee

Monday June 13, 2016

ARC Members attending: Christine Hobbs, Win Brown, Phil Eagleburger, Danny Ince, Lois Orr, David Kay and Anne Weir.

Also attending was Carin Ruff, CPHS Executive Director

 

3406 Rodman Street N.W.

Agent: Catarina Ferreira, archi-TEXTUAL

The proposal includes the conversion of the existing 2-car garage into living space; a 7-foot fence; and a trash can enclosure. The garage faces the alley.

As part of the ARC review of this project, it came to our attention that there was presented to the ANC planning and zoning committee, as well as to HPO staff, an earlier version of the project than that which was presented to the ARC on June 13th. The earlier version was distributed to all ARC members in the week prior to its June 13th meeting, then swapped out a few hours prior to the ARC meeting. The ARC members took the opportunity (and the time) to thoroughly review the earlier version, since this was expected to be presented. Several ARC members were surprised to be presented with a scheme entirely different from what was first distributed to them. We then learned that the design changes were a result of the earlier consultations with the ANC committee and with the HPO staff.

Being familiar with both versions of the design puts the ARC in a good position to understand the specifics of the guidance provided by the ANC committee and the HPO staff. The ARC disagrees with that guidance and is of the opinion that the revised version of the design is a less appealing result and, more importantly, is not in concert with the goals and aspirations of the Cleveland Park Historic District. One of the most important tenets of the Historic District is to not stifle the type of exuberance that created the district to begin with. Of course that does not mean that anything goes, but it does firmly suggest that there is room for change and innovation within the historic context. As Kathy Wood wrote to the neighborhood when the ARC and the Historic District were new, “We want [the historic preservation review process] to encourage rather than discourage innovative architectural design.” (Voices 1.1, Spring 1987)

Many factors come into play when evaluating the possibility of such change: “contributing” vs. “noncontributing” status, visibility, size of lot, scope of changes, impact on context, etc. On the one hand, a proposal affecting a large, contributing, highly-visible property would rightfully receive great scrutiny. On the other hand, a proposal affecting a small, noncontributing structure, fairly well concealed from public view, should be given greater leeway and opportunity for creative expression. This proposed accessory structure falls within the latter category. The existing structure is small relative to nearby houses, on a back alley, amongst a mishmash of garages and fences of seemingly ‘60s, ‘70s, ‘80s, pedigree – some well done, some not. The existing accessory structure, a 25 foot square, 2-car garage, with a simple, low-slope gable roof is not a particularly distinguished building type.

The original proposal called for breaking up the structure’s mass and altering its orientation, so that it would relate directly to its lot in a scaled and well-proportioned manner. It would animate and enliven the back alley to some degree. A small gesture, perhaps, but then that is precisely the point. We prefer not to stifle the “exuberance” exhibited by the original proposal and cause it to revert back to a tired, classic, poorly proportioned, model.

The neighbors have been contacted. The ARC neighbor consultation form is still outstanding.

The ARC has no objection to the proposal presented; however, the ARC urges approval and acceptance of the original design.

The motion passed 7-0

 

3056 Porter Street, N.W.

HPA #16-251

Agent: Ralph Cunningham, Cunningham|Quill

The proposal includes a side addition to the 1928 brick house. The addition would be brick and stucco. The house sits on a large, steeply-sloping lot, in the Ordway/Porter Street ravine. The side addition is placed in order to retain a portion of the rear yard that is flat and to avoid intruding into the ravine. The front porch would also be rebuilt and the basement floor would be lowered to create an 8 foot ceiling height. Another version of this project was scheduled for the March ARC meeting but was postponed. The neighbors reviewed these prior plans. The ARC neighbor consultation form for the current proposal is still outstanding.

The ARC has no objection to the proposal but has the following concern. The connector piece, part of the original house presents itself as part of the addition, due to the setback of the addition, the configuration of the roof across the second floor and the mud room door. The ARC suggests pulling the addition forward of the existing house in order to avoid this confusion.

The motion passed 7-0

 

3101 35th Street, N.W.

HPA #16-452

Agent: Ralph Cunningham, Cunningham|Quill

The proposal includes a two-story side addition and garage conversion. The 1923 brick house sits prominently at the northeast corner of 35th Street and Woodley Road. The front porch and steps would be redesigned and rebuilt, the garage would be converted into a studio and a swimming pool would be added in the rear. The side addition, 27 feet x 20 feet, 6 inches, would be smaller and subservient to the existing house with brick to coordinate with the existing house and a standing seam metal roof. There would be a new brick chimney on the north side and two new dormers on the east side (rear) of the house. New windows and doors would also be added in the rear.

The ARC neighbor comments form was submitted.

The ARC has no objection to the proposal but recommends that the original portico be reconstructed if documentation can be found. The motion passed 6-1.

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Architectural Review Committee Report: May 2016

Cleveland Park Historical Society Architectural Review Committee

Monday, May 9, 2016

ARC Members attending: Christine Hobbs, Ana Evans, Win Brown, Phil Eagleburger, Danny Ince, Lois Orr, Ron Ngiam, David Kay and Tina Mead.

Also attending was Carin Ruff, CPHS Executive Director

 

HPA 16-345
3512 Rodman Street NW
Rear addition
Architect: Chris Snowber

The proposal includes a two story rear addition to the 1927 house. An existing one story rear addition will be removed to be replaced by the proposed two story addition, a one story breakfast room and patio on the ground level. The addition will have masonry on the first floor, siding on the second floor, and paneling on the breakfast room. Also proposed is a rear shed and a new covered front entry, measuring 6 x 8, replacing a smaller existing portico. New windows will be added on the east side. The neighbors have been contacted.

The ARC has no objection to the proposal. However, the ARC recommends that the addition consist of one material, such as clapboard, to clearly delineate the addition from the existing house. Since the side indentations are so minimal, 4 inches on each side, material differentiation is particularly important. The ARC also notes that one of the “companion” houses on Rodman has also added an enlarged front entry.

The motion passed 9-0.

 

HPA #16-382
3703 Reno Rd.
Rear addition, driveway modifications
Architect: Charles Warren

The proposal includes a two and a half story rear addition to the 1928 house and driveway modifications. The addition would measure 22 x 14, be set back from the existing house 18 inches on both sides, and include a deck on the third level. The curb cut would be widened and the driveway would be expanded from eight to twelve feet. The front retaining wall and side steps would be rebuilt. The neighbors have been contacted, with several comments still outstanding.

The ARC has no objection to the proposal. However, the ARC suggests that there be greater differentiation between the second and third stories of the addition, so that the first two stories read as primary and the third story as a secondary, dormer-like structure. Also, the ARC recommends that the widening of the driveway me made to read as a sidewalk by using a different material than the concrete driveway along the walking strip.

The motion passed 9-0.

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Architectural Review Committee Report: April 2016

Cleveland Park Historical Society Architectural Review Committee

Monday, April 11, 2016

ARC Members attending: Christine Hobbs, Ana Evans, Win Brown, Phil Eagleburger, Danny Ince, Lois Orr, and Tina Mead.

Also attending was Carin Ruff, CPHS Executive Director

 

HPA #16-305

3203 Macomb Street, N.W.                      

Architect: Christina Haislip

This project was originally presented to the ARC in April, 2015. The revised proposal includes an additional story above the existing west-side addition and repair of the 1st floor garden room. Repairs to the garden room will include new French casement windows and a new standing seam metal roof and skylights. The proposed new curb cut, driveway, and new rear deck were previously permitted. The house is a non-contributing structure within the Cleveland Park Historic District. The neighbors have been contacted about the redesign, with one neighbor comment still outstanding.

The ARC has no objection to the proposed concept.

The motion passed 6-0. (Eagleburger recused.)

 

HPA 16-314

2939 Macomb Street, N.W.

Architect: Peter Grina, Grina Architects

The proposal includes new hipped roof dormers on the east and west sides of the house and a new rear dormer on the north side. Materials would match the existing house. The house is a contributing structure within the Cleveland Park Historic District, being a Sears kit house built in 1911. The neighbors have been contacted, with one comment still outstanding.

The ARC had no objection to the rear dormer, but had concerns about the side dormers. The ARC has deferred a decision until 3-D drawings are available, including a view of the proposed side dormers from the street. The ARC considers the house to be important to the historic district and thinks that the proposed changes to the house should go beyond a staff decision and should not be placed on the consent calendar.

The motion passed 6-1.

Note: The ARC subsequently approved placing the project on the consent calendar after seeing further drawings.

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Read More about Cultural Landscapes

Glenn Stach mentioned lots of great resources in his talk for us on cultural landscapes on April 5th. Here are links to some of the resources he mentioned:

For more about Cleveland Park specifically, including our National Register nomination form, see our Cleveland Park History page.

Note: As mentioned during the question period, National Register of Historic Places or National Historic Landmark status does not in itself provide protection for properties. Real historic preservation protection comes from local preservation ordinances. However, in Washington, D.C. only, National Register listing is harmonized with local historic designation, and National Register Historic Districts are explicitly protected under D.C.’s historic preservation law. Read more about local and federal preservation laws here. To check the national and local historic status of sites within the District of Columbia, consult the D.C. Inventory of Historic Sites.

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